Monday, July 5, 2010

Introduction to Molecular Geometry

Introduction to Molecular Geometry: Molecular Geometry or molecular structure is the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms within a molecule. It is important to be able to predict and understand the molecular structure of a molecule because many of the properties of a substance are determined by its geometry.

Molecular geometry angles contain a range of question, as we have large number of results about geometry angles. Molecular geometry angles exist as person as well as with lot of other geometric figures. Most of the molecular geometry angles figures are specified by their angles, like square, rectangles, triangles etc. since of so wide presence geometric angle have lot of results in them. These lots of results make a wide range of molecular geometry angles.

The Valence Shell, Bonding Pairs, and VSEPR Model

The outermost electrons of an atom are its valence electrons. The valence electrons are the electrons that are most often involved in forming bonds and making molecules.

Pairs of electrons are shared between atoms in a molecule and hold the atoms together. These pairs are called "bonding pairs".

One way to predict the way electrons within atoms will repel each other is to apply the VSEPR (valence-shell electron-pair repulsion) model. VSEPR can be used to determine a molecule's general geometry.

Predicting Molecular Geometry

Here is a chart that describes the usual geometry for molecules based on their bonding behavior. To use this key, first draw out the Lewis structure for a molecule. Count how many electron pairs are present, including both bonding pairs and lone pairs. Treat both double and triple bonds as if they were single electron pairs. A is used to represent the central atom. B indicates atoms surrounding A. E indicates the number of lone electron pairs. Bond angles are predicted in the following order:

lone pair versus lone pair repulsion > lone pair versus bonding pair repulsion > bonding pair versus bonding pair repulsion

Molecular Geometry

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